(via chal-bae)

tzakartinsani:

Shirin NeshatSoliloquy Series2000Production still© 2000 Shirin NeshatPhoto taken by Larry Barns

tzakartinsani:

Shirin Neshat
Soliloquy Series
2000
Production still
© 2000 Shirin Neshat
Photo taken by Larry Barns

(via chal-bae)

(via chal-bae)

“The first effect of existentialism is that it puts every man in possession of himself as he is, and places the entire responsibility for his existence squarely upon his own shoulders.”
— Jean-Paul Sartre, “Existentialism is a Humanism” (via sisyphean-revolt)
“…One might indeed consider that the appropriate form of address between man and man ought to be, not monsieur, sir, but fellow sufferer, compagnon de misères. However strange this may sound it corresponds to the nature of the case, makes us see other men in a true light and reminds us of what are the most necessary of all things: tolerance, patience, forbearance and charity, which each of us needs and which each of us therefore owes.”
— Arthur Schopenhauer (via sisyphean-revolt)
“What I want now is not happiness but awareness. One thinks one has cut oneself off from the world, but it is enough to see an olive tree upright in the golden dust, or beaches glistening in the morning sun, to feel this separation melt away. Thus with me. I became aware of the possibilities for which I am responsible. Every minute of life carries with it its miraculous value, and its face of eternal youth.”
— Albert Camus - Notebooks (via sisyphean-revolt)
“The majority of men are subjective towards themselves and objective towards all others, terribly objective sometimes — but the real task is in fact to be objective towards oneself and subjective towards all others.”
— Soren Kierkegaard  (via sisyphean-revolt)

(via sisyphean-revolt)

When my husband [Carl Sagan] died, because he was so famous and known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — and ask me if Carl changed at the end and converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again.

Carl faced his death with unflagging courage and never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief and precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive and we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous and so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space and the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me and it’s much more meaningful.

The way he treated me and the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other and our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.

Ann Druyan (via whats-out-there)

(via langleav)

preciousandfregilethings:

Auguste Rodin - Le Penseur

preciousandfregilethings:

Auguste Rodin - Le Penseur

All I ask of the Universe, of God (if there is one) and therefore of myself is to have good sense.